Category Archives: Death of Painting

Paradox and Conflict

  “Painting As Paradox is an exercise in synthesizing the research of eclectic practices of young emerging artists grappling with various legacies of painting. Their work reflects a continual gesturing towards tradition and a concurrent redefinition of painting in contemporary … Continue reading

Posted in Conflicts, Death of Painting, Illusion/ mimesis, Materiality, Paint Application, Ruination, Uncertainty | Leave a comment

On Paintings and Words that Fail Them

 On first looking at the painting in Madrid,  during May 2014, I was overwhelmed by a physical reaction to the way that the paint was applied. Thinner passages, thicker impasto areas and glossy paint contrasted with more matt areas. However … Continue reading

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A New Essence? Or the Death of the Death of Painting

The painter Nigel Cooke (2012) opens his PhD thesis with a discussion of “the long-dead conversation around the death of painting”[i]: he explains that painting still occurs in many amateur contexts and he continues to describe the ‘death’ as inherently … Continue reading

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Speculative Paintings II: Co-Authorship

Outside Works At the last supervisory meeting, in May, Tim Edensor suggested allowing human and non-human agencies to create paintings. I had already begun to take up this idea in earnest the month before, as I had left canvases outside. … Continue reading

Posted in Co-Authorship, Colour, Death of Painting, Death of the Author, Materiality, New Materialism, Painting, Ruination | 1 Comment

Painting in Ruins (Revised First Presentation/ Written Piece)

The word ruin describes “something which is in the act of disintegrating or being  destroyed, or the process of destruction itself”. (OED) I will research ‘painting as ruin’ in relation to a depictive engagement with ruins themselves and aim to … Continue reading

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